Science & Technology Links

Nautilus

Nautilus is an online and print science magazine that “combines the sciences, culture and philosophy into a single story.” It publishes one “issue” on a selected topic each month on its website, releasing one “chapter” each Thursday.

  • The Case for Being Skeptical of Moral Outrage - Facts So Romantic
    If, as the research shows, our moral outrage is highly sensitive to actions but not consequences, we might want to treat feelings of moral outrage—whether others’ or our own—skeptically. Photograph by Vjacheslav_Kozyrev / FlickrThe episode last month at the Lincoln Memorial, involving the boys from Covington Catholic High School, and… Read more »
  • What Dark Matter Needs Are New Kinds of Experiments - Issue 69: Patterns
    Three decades have passed since the first direct search for dark matter, a modest attempt at recycling the data from a particle detector originally built for another purpose. This work was a rapid response to a proposal by theoretical physicists Mark Goodman and Edward Witten, who called attention to the… Read more »
  • Watch and See: The Medium Really Is the Message - Issue 69: Patterns
    Cesar Hidalgo, director of the Collective Learning group at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab, would like you to know that Marshall McLuhan was right. And he has the datasets to prove it. In a new paper, “How the Medium Shapes the Message: Printing and the Rise of the… Read more »
  • The Impossible Mathematics of the Real World - Issue 69: Patterns
    Using stiff paper and transparent tape, Craig Kaplan assembles a beautiful roundish shape that looks like a Buckminster Fuller creation or a fancy new kind of soccer ball. It consists of four regular dodecagons (12-sided polygons with all angles and sides the same) and 12 decagons (10-sided), with 28 little… Read more »
  • Why We Stink at Tackling Climate Change - Issue 69: Patterns
    What’s wrong with us? Not us Democrats, Republicans, or Americans. Rather, what’s wrong with our species, Homo sapiens? If human beings are as Hamlet suggested, “noble in reason, infinite in faculty,” then why are we facing so many problems? In many ways, people are better off than ever before: reduced… Read more »

Ars Technica

Ars Technica is a website covering news and opinions in technology, science, politics, and society, created by Ken Fisher and Jon Stokes in 1998. It publishes news, reviews, and guides on issues such as computer hardware and software, science, technology policy, and video games.

  • Guidemaster: The least-awful Android phones
    Enlarge / These two got new phones, and look at how happy they are! (credit: Ron Amadeo) So you want to buy an Android phone, eh? It's often said that a strength of the Android ecosystem is the sheer number of manufacturers out there producing devices, but that also means… Read more »
  • Anthem review: BioWare’s sky-high gaming ambition crashes back to Earth
    Enlarge (credit: EA / Bioware) BioWare, the developer responsible for Mass Effect and Dragon Age, has returned with its first new series in over a decade, Anthem. It's a pretty big departure for the RPG-heavy studio: a jetpack-fueled, action-first online "looter-shooter." And after a disastrous demo launched weeks ago, we wondered whether we'd even… Read more »
  • The mythos and meaning behind Pokémon’s most famous glitch
    Enlarge / Being the result of a glitch doesn't make MissingNo any less real to players—or researchers. (credit: Nintendo / Wilma Bainbridge) Warning: This article contains references to the plot of Pokémon: Red and Blue and the more recent (but related to the topic here) game, Doki Doki Literature Club.… Read more »
  • The Samsung Galaxy S10 is coming! Here’s what to expect
    On February 20, Samsung is throwing a huge party in San Francisco, where it will take the wraps off its flagship smartphone lineup for 2019. Given the unbelievable amount of leaks that poured forth, we know just about everything Samsung is planning to show off. We're going to learn all about… Read more »
  • Google’s Waymo risks repeating Silicon Valley’s most famous blunder
    Enlarge (credit: Aurich Lawson / Getty Images / Waymo) Everyone in Silicon Valley knows the story of Xerox inventing the modern personal computer in the 1970s and then failing to commercialize it effectively. Yet one of Silicon Valley's most successful companies, Google's Alphabet, appears to be repeating Xerox's mistake with… Read more »

Quanta Magazine

Quanta Magazine is an editorially independent online publication of the Simons Foundation covering developments in mathematics, theoretical physics, theoretical computer science and the basic life sciences.

  • How Our Universe Could Emerge as a Hologram
    The fabric of space and time is widely believed by physicists to be emergent, stitched out of quantum threads according to an unknown pattern. And for 22 years, they’ve had a toy model of how emergent space-time can work: a theoretical “universe in a bottle,” as its discoverer, Juan Maldacena,… Read more »
  • Möbius Strips Defy a Link With Infinity
    In math, three-dimensional space sprawls out to infinity in every direction. With an infinite amount of room, it should be able to hold an infinite number of things inside of it — pearls, peacocks or even planets. But a recent proof by Olga Frolkina, a mathematician at Moscow State University,… Read more »
  • New Squid Genome Shines Light on Symbiotic Evolution
    Every evening, nocturnal Hawaiian bobtail squids (Euprymna scolopes) emerge from their burrows in shallow waters of the Pacific to hunt for shrimp. These soft-bodied, golf ball-size cephalopods don’t have much to protect them from predators like seals, eels and fish. So they rely on another organism to help out: the… Read more »
  • How to Find Simple Treasures in Complex Numbers
    For our first Insights puzzle of 2019, let’s go on a treasure hunt. To prepare you for this adventure, let me start by giving you a valuable thought to ponder: It is possible for anyone to understand that “imaginary” numbers (numbers that contain the seemingly nonsensical square root of minus… Read more »
  • Mysterious Quantum Rule Reconstructed From Scratch
    Everyone knows that quantum mechanics is an odd theory, but they don’t necessarily know why. The usual story is that it’s the quantum world itself that’s odd, with its superpositions, uncertainty and entanglement (the mysterious interdependence of observed particle states). All the theory does is reflect that innate peculiarity, right?… Read more »

SpaceX

Space Exploration Technologies Corp., doing business as SpaceX, is a private American aerospace manufacturer and space transportation services company headquartered in Hawthorne, California. It was founded in 2002 by entrepreneur Elon Musk with the goal of reducing space transportation costs and enabling the colonization of Mars. SpaceX has since developed the Falcon launch vehicle family and the Dragon spacecraft family, which both currently deliver payloads into Earth orbit.

  • Dragon Resupply Mission (CRS-16)
    Packed with about two tons of cargo and science, SpaceX’s Dragon spacecraft departed the International Space Station on Sunday, January 13. A parachute-assisted splashdown in the Pacific Ocean occurred at about 9:10 p.m. PST, just west of Baja California. That same evening, a recovery team secured Dragon on a boat… Read more »
  • IRIDIUM-8 MISSION
    On Friday, January 11 at 7:31 a.m. PST, 15:31 UTC, SpaceX successfully launched the eighth and final set of satellites in a series of 75 total satellites for Iridium’s next generation global satellite constellation, Iridium NEXT. Falcon 9’s first stage delivered the second stage to its targeted orbit followed by… Read more »
  • GPS III Space Vehicle 01 Mission
    On Sunday, December 23rd at 5:51 a.m. PST, SpaceX successfully launched the United States Air Force’s first Global Positioning System III space vehicle (SV) from Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida. The satellite was deployed to its intended orbit approximately 1 hour and 56… Read more »
  • Dragon Resupply Mission (CRS-16)
    On Wednesday, December 5, 2018, SpaceX launched its sixteenth Commercial Resupply Services mission (CRS-16) to the International Space Station. Liftoff occurred at 1:16 p.m. EST, or 18:16 UTC, from Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida. Read more »
  • Spaceflight SSO-A: SmallSat Express Mission
    On Monday, December 3rd at 10:34 a.m. PST, SpaceX successfully launched Spaceflight SSO-A: SmallSat Express to a low Earth orbit from Space Launch Complex 4E (SLC-4E) at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. Carrying 64 payloads, this mission represented the largest single rideshare mission from a U.S.-based launch vehicle to date.… Read more »

Nasa

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is an independent agency of the United States Federal Government responsible for the civilian space program, as well as aeronautics and aerospace research. NASA was established in 1958, succeeding the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.


MinutePhysics

MinutePhysics is an educational YouTube channel created by Henry Reich. The channel’s videos include time-lapsed drawing to explain physics-related topics in approximately one minute. As of November 2017, the channel has over 4 million subscribers.


American Psychological Association

The American Psychological Association is the largest scientific and professional organization of psychologists in the United States, with around 117,500 members including scientists, educators, clinicians, consultants, and students.


Google Science News

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